Cast bronze

Detailed view of cast bronze and gold leaf sculpture by Terrell Lozada

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, Escape (detail), Cast bronze, gold leaf, 56 x 13 x 6.5 inches

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, Escape (view 1), Cast bronze, gold leaf, 56 x 13 x 6.5 inches, $18,000

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, Family dynamic (view 1), Cast bronze, 51.5 x 12 x 8 inches. Private collection

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, Family dynamic (detail), Cast bronze, 51.5 x 12 x 8 inches.

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, Family dynamic (view 2), Cast bronze, 51.5 x 12 x 8 inches. Private collection

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, Cave (view 1), Cast bronze, gold leaf, 12 x 12 x 12 inches. $12,000

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, Cave (view 2), Cast bronze, gold leaf, 12 x 12 x 12 inches. $12,000

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, Torso (view 1), Cast bronze, gold leaf 51×17.5×16.5inches. $30,000

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, Torso (view 2), Cast bronze, gold leaf 51×17.5×16.5inches. $30,000

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, Laparoscope (view 1), Cast bronze, 12 x 14 x 14 inches. $12,000

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, Laparoscope (view 2), Cast bronze, 12 x 14 x 14 inches. $12,000

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, Pelvic Basin (view 1), Cast bronze, 16.5 x 8 x 4.5 inches. Private collection

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, Pelvic Basin (view 2), Cast bronze, 16.5 x 8 x 4.5 inches. Private collection

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, She takes after my side of the family, Cast bronze, gold leaf, 31 x 8.5 x 6 inches. Private collection

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, Pelvic tilt, Cast bronze, 16.5 x 8 x4.5inches. $4,100

© 2000 Terrell Lozada, Room, Cast bronze, 3 x 3.25 x 3 inches. Private collection

Transcendent Possibilities by Celine McKeon

Terrell Lozada fearlessly leaps into the loud inferno of modern life, molten bronze, and blood legacies, only to emerge with a series of sculptures that transmutes hot chaos into a quiet, focused evocation of beauty and transcendence.

Walls of the Body is an installation that acknowledges and moves beyond sorrowful limitations- it reflects back to us the possibility of joy, the grace of clarity, and the golden hues of bliss.

Lozada’s sculpture asks the question, “How does one thing relate to another?” Her work explores relationships of containment. A quiet space inside the body, a body fitting inside a room, a sculpture inhabiting an empty space, our deepest longing to find shelter in the truth.

Sculpture is inanimate, but has the power to evoke emotion and the desire to touch. The Walls of the Body installation provokes interaction. The viewer’s attention is propelled toward a central focus so there is no place to go outside of looking into each work. It is with this look inside, that the emergence of possibilities first becomes apparent.

This play on perspective began with Lozada’s childhood experience of being able to run through and explore the beautiful Teatro Olimpico while living in Italy.

The Teatro Olimpico, built in 1580, is significant in the history of theatre design because the architect, Andrea Palladio, created three special zones,
Which were thematically distinct, yet united by their juxtaposition.

As a child, running through the exaggerated space of the theatre’s sets was magical. All of Lozada’s work is influenced by this experience. Her creative exploration is about perspective and moving through space in search of an opening.

Every sculpture in this series has a wall in it. These walls signify organic and emotional structure. The figures and objects embedded in the walls symbolize the juxtaposition of something separate from the ever-demanding human body. The images found traversing the walls are far more seductive than their outward physical support.

Lozada’s sculpture reverses the dominance of outward appearances and delicately suggests an exploration of transcendent possibilities.

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